Futility

June 22nd, 2013

1911_glock_21_sm

This is America. If you believe enough, and if you try hard enough, you can do almost anything. You could be an astronaut, a head of state, or even start a snarky blog of your own.

If you try really hard, you can even force a 1911 magazine to seat and lock into a Glock 21.

Wrong magazine, boyo

Fortunately, you can't make it chamber a round.

That's Unexpected

December 18th, 2012

stock-photo-ammunition-with-red-polymer-tipped-bullets-that-is-back-lit-67513702

Cheaper Than Dirt

I was ordering parts from Cheaper than Dirt last night, and I noticed they're not selling guns at all anymore. I'm not sure when this happened or why. Maybe they failed an audit or something.

Oddly enough, their cached page on Google still shows them, so this must be recent.

Cheaper Than Dirt

For those inclined towards conspiracy, Cerberus is selling off Freedom Group, the conglomerate that owns Remington, Marlin, DPMS, and Bushmaster. While the timing suggests politics, the Freedom Group is over $600 million in debt, and I'd been hearing rumors of …

Return of the Glock 7

December 9th, 2012

plastic_gun

It looks like the anti-gunners will do anything to push that "conversation" they keep saying they want with us. Today's example is a demand by Brady Campaign poster boy Steve Israel to renew the Undetectable Firearms Act.

Signed into law by President Reagan in 1988, the Act was a response to fears over newer methods of fabricating firearms parts. At the time, there was great concern about the polymer frame of the new Glock pistol, and the possibility that it could be invisible to airport metal detectors (1).

It sunset after ten years in 1998. It was then resurrected …

The Heartbreak of Bullet Setback

October 25th, 2012

The Woes of Bullet Setback

Take a good look, kids. Don't flinch. Don't avert your eyes. Bullet setback is real, and it could be happening in your very own neighborhood as we speak.

"Impossible!" you say. "My community is free of hippies and bullet setback! It could never touch our halcyon lives of quiet desperation!"

You'd be wrong. Dead gun wrong. See Timmy with his new 1911? Look how shiny it is! A wholesome, all-American boy with his all-American gun! But watch as Timmy loads up a magazine and slaps it into the pistol to "function test" it. He dry-cycles …

Ah, Saturdays.

October 6th, 2012

The good: I took home a 3" S&W 66, a gun I've long been seeking.

S&W 66-4

This one left the factory in 1994, the same year Tip O'Neil died, alternative rock pretty much fell apart, and a big comet smacked into Jupiter. The records are inconsistent, but it doesn't appear many of this iteration were made, making it an even rarer example of an already elusive pistol.

The 3" K-Frames are one of the most versatile and effective carry guns out there. I've waxed poetic on the virtues of the fixed-sight versions before, but a …

S&W Model 27

August 27th, 2012

S&W 27-2

When Smith & Wesson introduced the .357 Magnum cartridge in 1935, it was something of a big deal. The 44-caliber N-Frame had been tasked to chambering the new load, but the company went one step further in making the fit and finish the best they'd ever done.

Elmer Keith and Phil Sharpe put a great deal of work and experimentation on the cartridge, and they saw it pay off. The ad copy spoke of a load capable of defeating body armor and punching through automobile bodies with authority, and its accuracy was universally lauded. Such was the prestige behind the gun itself that it was built to order for customers, who could choose any barrel length, sight picture, trigger type, and point of impact they wanted. The initial guns were packaged with a registration certificate and referred to as Registered Magnums.

The gun was met with immediate acclaim from law enforcement, with the 3 1/2" barreled version being the most popular. The first specimen off the assembly line (now tragically lost) was issued to J. Edgar Hoover, with the subsequent units going to Keith and Sharpe. General Patton carried one for most of his late career.

Initially, the pistol was simply called the .357 Magnum. When Smith & Wesson went to more prosaic model numbers in the late 1950's, it became the Model 27.

Wallet Holsters

May 27th, 2012

NFA Wallet Holster

Somebody at the local gun shows has been selling these things, and it could create a potential problem for the unwary buyer. You see, that's not an ordinary pocket holster. Thanks to the National Firearms Act of 1934, it's been imbued with special powers necessitating registration and taxation.

What makes it different? It's designed so that the gun can be fired without removing it from the holster. As such, it falls under the same restrictions as cane guns, Stinger pens, and the infamous H&K MP5 briefcase. Walking around with your gun in one of these is treated with the same gravity as owning an unregistered machine gun.

I'm not being snarky here. True, you've known me to be facetious in the past. It's a personality quirk of mine, but I am not being a snickerpuss here.

Tactical Operator of the Day

May 17th, 2012

Ah, YouTube: a veritable cornucopia of questionable gun advice. Today's example is MrSurplusnut. See if you can make it all the way through without cringing.

MrSurplusnut, ready for action!

He likes the word "scenario," and he really likes his CCW badge. By the two-minute mark, I lost count of the number of times he swept the camera with his finger on the trigger of a loaded gun.

It's the Economy, Stupid

January 2nd, 2012

The FBI reports that there were 500,000 NICS checks performed for gun purchases in the week before Christmas. That's a record, beating even the whole post-election rush. There were 129,166 checks this Black Friday, beating the previous record of 98,000 in 2008.

The media, few of whom are in touch with the gun culture, are postulating all sorts of reasons for the boom, but they're missing the real factors. I submit that this year's record numbers are more due to increased interest in the hobby and confidence in the economy than they are to paranoia, crime, or politics.

In 2009, …

They Said It Couldn't Happen

December 6th, 2011

But it did. Blaine Tyler was openly carrying his handgun in a Richmond gas station when a teenage sociopath grabbed it. Unarmed, Tyler gave chase and was fatally shot with his own gun. To make things worse, his assailant went on to kill a second person hours later.

Tyler was deliberately targeted for his weapon, something people keep telling me never happens. Well, here we have it. Perhaps better situational awareness, equipment, or training might have helped, but at the end of the day, he would not have been targeted if his weapon wasn't plainly visible.

Having the weapon exposed adds …

Sharp Edges and Frayed Nerves

November 28th, 2011

CZ P-01 w/Bayonet

The Supreme Court has refused [pdf] to hear United States v. Masciandaro. That leaves Woollard v. Sheridan, which still has decent odds of making it to the calendar.

There's been some scuttlebutt that the Court would rather hear a "pure" case in which the petitioner isn't someone appealing a criminal conviction. Both the Heller and McDonald cases fit this bill, as they were brought by law-abiding citizens appealing unjust laws. In such cases, the Court can address a constitutional issue directly, without having other …

Perishable Skills

November 27th, 2011

Earl Takes A Few for the Team

I finally got to shoot the P210 on Saturday, and Earl here volunteered to take a few rounds for the sake of experimentation. The group is a mix of 147gr Hydra-Shok, 9BPLE, and 127gr +P+ Ranger. It was shot at a measly 20' since I haven't had a chance to shoot for nearly six months, and my skills have atrophied a bit.

The gun doesn't seem to care much about bullet shape or weight, and it's very consistent. Given its heritage, I expected it to prefer hotter European ball for …

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